Innovation and the Octopus

To create something innovative, one needs to look at things in a new way, going a quantum leap away from the well-trodden paths of the usual. To help stimulate creativity, try examining something unusual, something very different from our familiar world view.

Our way of viewing the world is that of an upright two legged, with two upper limbs and a hand at the end of each, having prehensile fingers.

Our companion animals usually are 4-legged, mostly with more acute sensory abilities than us, but overall, not too unlike ourselves and our view.

Our robotic creations tend to follow those structures and patterns, remaining close to the familiar.
For a very different perspective, consider the octopus and their marvelous abilities; a species millions of years older than our own.

Invertebrate: a large octopus can still squeeze through a 2 inch opening (or even smaller), presenting a challenge to keeping curious octopuses inside man-made containers or tanks. To date our robotic designs are vertebrate-centric; one might consider a soft robot, modeled after the octopus.

While almost all our cognitive neural capacity is centrally located in our brain, the octopus uses a more distributed model, with only about half centrally located, with the rest distributed to its limbs.

A user of tools and toys, one might contemplate what an octopus considers amusing or beautiful. What are the means and media of beauty and harmony for an octopus? How might that intersect with our own aesthetic concepts? Does the geometric pleasure of a Bach fugue resonate for an octopus?

Octopuses exhibit a wide range of behavioral patterns, perhaps falling into categories: are some more extroverted? How can one design a Meyers-Briggs type personality test for an octopus? For robots, how does one differentiate an introvert versus extrovert?

One might not readily associate the octopus with fashion and design, but some creative ideas might arise from contemplation of how a color-blind creature superbly camouflages more quickly than a chameleon. Could a chair be adaptive to the color or pattern of clothes worn by the person adorning it? Or have jewels adapt to nearby attire? (e.g., a modernized, Tiffany-class mood ring).

So much difference from our own way of being, our perceptions, should lead to some inspirations for innovation.

For those curious about the wonders of the octopus, try Sy Montgomery’s “Soul of an Octopus”. It’s a rich, clear and easy read, with the author’s tinge of wonder about the world.

Agile User Stories and Application as Persona


In Agile, requirements are communicated via user stories.  Traditional user stories use the form, “As a …, I want to …, so that I can ….”.  For example, “As a first time user, I want to be able to create a user name and password, so I can securely do transactions.”   That enables functional requirements to be captured as user features, but still does not address the often critical “non functional requirements” (NFR) in an Agile framework.  NFR are items sometimes associated with infrastructure, such as capacity, scalability, reliability, availability, or security.

One approach to including NFR in an Agile context is to create user stories based upon the application itself as having a role or persona.  For example:

“As an application, I want to be able to process xxx transactions per second, to be able to handle peak monthly demand.”

“As an application, I want to be resistant to SQL injection attacks, so that my transaction integrity remains valid.”

Appropriate acceptance criteria need to be included; phrasing those can be challenging in these cases.

Extending the concept of the application persona further, it can also be used for other aspects of the application, such as user interface or user experience.  Those may fall outside the straightforward transactional features covered by more typical user stories; use it for the more qualitative ones, the fuzzier parts.  The usual guidelines still apply: make the story as granular as possible;  and to include acceptance criteria.  Acceptance criteria can be very difficult to create when one is trying to specify aspects of user experience as quality or beauty.

Taking this further still to the more general case of product development, including the difficult cases of ad campaigns or branding, the concept of the application or product as a persona remains tenable.

E.g., “As a brand, I want to be able to highlight the excitement of using our products, so that I can …..”