Innovation and the Octopus

To create something innovative, one needs to look at things in a new way, going a quantum leap away from the well-trodden paths of the usual. To help stimulate creativity, try examining something unusual, something very different from our familiar world view.

Our way of viewing the world is that of an upright two legged, with two upper limbs and a hand at the end of each, having prehensile fingers.

Our companion animals usually are 4-legged, mostly with more acute sensory abilities than us, but overall, not too unlike ourselves and our view.

Our robotic creations tend to follow those structures and patterns, remaining close to the familiar.
For a very different perspective, consider the octopus and their marvelous abilities; a species millions of years older than our own.

Invertebrate: a large octopus can still squeeze through a 2 inch opening (or even smaller), presenting a challenge to keeping curious octopuses inside man-made containers or tanks. To date our robotic designs are vertebrate-centric; one might consider a soft robot, modeled after the octopus.

While almost all our cognitive neural capacity is centrally located in our brain, the octopus uses a more distributed model, with only about half centrally located, with the rest distributed to its limbs.

A user of tools and toys, one might contemplate what an octopus considers amusing or beautiful. What are the means and media of beauty and harmony for an octopus? How might that intersect with our own aesthetic concepts? Does the geometric pleasure of a Bach fugue resonate for an octopus?

Octopuses exhibit a wide range of behavioral patterns, perhaps falling into categories: are some more extroverted? How can one design a Meyers-Briggs type personality test for an octopus? For robots, how does one differentiate an introvert versus extrovert?

One might not readily associate the octopus with fashion and design, but some creative ideas might arise from contemplation of how a color-blind creature superbly camouflages more quickly than a chameleon. Could a chair be adaptive to the color or pattern of clothes worn by the person adorning it? Or have jewels adapt to nearby attire? (e.g., a modernized, Tiffany-class mood ring).

So much difference from our own way of being, our perceptions, should lead to some inspirations for innovation.

For those curious about the wonders of the octopus, try Sy Montgomery’s “Soul of an Octopus”. It’s a rich, clear and easy read, with the author’s tinge of wonder about the world.

Innovation and Cognitive Diversity

 When we form a team, we tend to populate it with people whose thought processes are similar to our own. It’s natural, in part because it’s easier on us. People whose priorities and thought processes are distinctly different from our own are potential sources of friction within the group.

 But when there’s a need to address complex issues, come up with innovation, combine components in new and value-enhancing ways, then having a team that is cognitively diverse is of benefit. Cognitive diversity means diversity in how we think, in how we perceive and prioritize those perceptions.

 There are some necessary conditions for cognitive diversity to have benefit: team members have to be able to get along with each other, and to work together towards a goal commonly agreed upon.

 Cognitive diversity implies that some members of the group will perceive the world differently, and have distinct mental toolsets associating those perceptions. The interaction between cohesive yet distinct viewpoints allows for fresh solutions, perhaps combining existing processes or elements in new ways.