Startups and Social Capital

At a recent evening meeting, a panel discussion under the #thinkleader program sponsored by IBM, the panelists represented different startups. They were smart, energetic and focused, aware of the murky waters in which they swam. It was clear that they had considered and planned for financial capital; likewise for the talents and skills needed. But a common thread of difficulties had to do with external support for their fledgling companies.

One panelist had been surprised at the drop-off from when he was a manager at a well-known brand, with many eager acquaintances, to the sudden vacuum now that he was co-founder of a startup. It wasn’t just the challenge itself posed by the need for external support, those willing to give referrals on their behalf, pass along useful ideas and the like, but the element of surprise of that drop-off.

Startups need to include building of social capital as part of their business plan. It’s not just marketing or branding. The ability to count on someone for information, for referrals, for the myriad types of support that can face a startup is a form of wealth. In a prior post, focused on individuals, the concept of Cognitive Wealth was explored. Similarly for startups, social capital needs to be planned for and built, as an explicit part of the business plan.

And if you’re young in your career or going through a major change, try thinking of yourself as a startup.

Innovation and the Octopus

To create something innovative, one needs to look at things in a new way, going a quantum leap away from the well-trodden paths of the usual. To help stimulate creativity, try examining something unusual, something very different from our familiar world view.

Our way of viewing the world is that of an upright two legged, with two upper limbs and a hand at the end of each, having prehensile fingers.

Our companion animals usually are 4-legged, mostly with more acute sensory abilities than us, but overall, not too unlike ourselves and our view.

Our robotic creations tend to follow those structures and patterns, remaining close to the familiar.
For a very different perspective, consider the octopus and their marvelous abilities; a species millions of years older than our own.

Invertebrate: a large octopus can still squeeze through a 2 inch opening (or even smaller), presenting a challenge to keeping curious octopuses inside man-made containers or tanks. To date our robotic designs are vertebrate-centric; one might consider a soft robot, modeled after the octopus.

While almost all our cognitive neural capacity is centrally located in our brain, the octopus uses a more distributed model, with only about half centrally located, with the rest distributed to its limbs.

A user of tools and toys, one might contemplate what an octopus considers amusing or beautiful. What are the means and media of beauty and harmony for an octopus? How might that intersect with our own aesthetic concepts? Does the geometric pleasure of a Bach fugue resonate for an octopus?

Octopuses exhibit a wide range of behavioral patterns, perhaps falling into categories: are some more extroverted? How can one design a Meyers-Briggs type personality test for an octopus? For robots, how does one differentiate an introvert versus extrovert?

One might not readily associate the octopus with fashion and design, but some creative ideas might arise from contemplation of how a color-blind creature superbly camouflages more quickly than a chameleon. Could a chair be adaptive to the color or pattern of clothes worn by the person adorning it? Or have jewels adapt to nearby attire? (e.g., a modernized, Tiffany-class mood ring).

So much difference from our own way of being, our perceptions, should lead to some inspirations for innovation.

For those curious about the wonders of the octopus, try Sy Montgomery’s “Soul of an Octopus”. It’s a rich, clear and easy read, with the author’s tinge of wonder about the world.