Project Complexity – Often Overlooked

The project isn’t going as you expected. It’s no single obvious thing; project scope is not huge, but there’s that feeling of bits of rough going, just not flowing smoothly.

You might just be dealing with a project of greater complexity than you believed, if there even was an explicit estimate of complexity at project initiation. Seldom is an estimate of complexity included in a project charter, from my observations.

Projects of greater complexity are situations where one needs to bring out tools and techniques that most PM’s seldom utilize in their day to day work, unless mandated by a PMO. The specific tools needed depend upon what factors are causing that complexity.

First, that estimate: t-shirt sizing usually suffices, but in some project ecosystems and portfolios, quantitative metrics are used. They might even be part of the weighting of that project in the portfolio.

Far more likely is that there was no explicit estimate of complexity. Hardly surprising, with complexity barely mentioned in the latest PMBoK, and not at all in most older editions. But there’s a comforting number of articles in recent years on project complexity, contributing factors, models and templates. It’s up to you to read and determine which are most appropriate to your projects.

Just to get thought processes rolling, a few factors adding to complexity:
– Diverse stakeholders
– Conflicts between stakeholders
– Extended duration of the project, especially if multi-year
– Major impact on the enterprise
– Uncertainty in the overall environment, including economic factors
– Regulatory impact
– Social impact (which may imply political domain)
– Uncertain or very leading edge technology

Consider the overall environment and uncertainty: is it the general economic picture, or are there industry specific factors; or geographic specific elements. Evaluate how volatile the priorities are within the enterprise. What about the stability of the project team, over the life of the project.

One place to start if to review risk management. Go over the plan and the risk identification process. How comfortable are you with the completeness of identification? If there is large impact on the enterprise from some of those risks, take extra care in analyzing and managing them; review those regularly.

PM’s working on construction projects live in a sea of complexity: a challenging regulatory environment; social impact for the geographic area; uncertainty due to weather, etc. But mostly they are conscious of this and develop risk management strategies accordingly It is my sibling PM’s working on IT and business process projects or products are often surprised by the complexity of the effort that they are trying to shepherd home.

Projects with significant social or political impact increase complexity. Pay particular attention to stakeholder management and an explicit, carefully crafted communications plan. It may be necessary to include some feedback mechanism in it, to ensure that communications are working, in both directions.

Projects of higher complexity may need more frequent checkpoints or milestones. Consider doing a Lessons Learned at some of those milestones, not just at project closeout, to permit adjustments during the life of the project. Depending upon the causes of complexity, extra attention may be needed for post delivery.

Go back to some past projects, reviewing ones that had some unexpected difficulty, Try estimating their complexity. For the ones of higher complexity (L or XL in t-shirt sizing), try to write down the factors contributing to it.

For your future, estimating project complexity should encourage a mindful use of PM tools.

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Paired Project Management

You probably have seen some of the statistics on project success rates, or more aptly, the rate of the lack of success. The Standish Group’s Chaos report is often cited as one source. There are numerous causes, but one suspects the statistics are even worse for projects of greater complexity.

There are multiple factors to project complexity: the impact strategically or financially to the enterprise; the overall stability of the environment; degree of uncertainty (in multiple dimensions and constraints – from, “is this definitely the right path?” to “will key resources remain”); the number of different disciplines involved; severity of social or legal impact; etc. Far too often, project managers don’t evaluate complexity at project initiation, only realizing the project is of significantly more complexity when difficulties are encountered.

Rule of thumb in planning:
the more complex an undertaking, the more likely any one individual will miss some key element.

One of the interesting practices in the Extreme Programming (XP) movement has been use of pair programming. Two programmers sharing a keyboard and monitor, working together. The typical dynamic is that of driver and navigator; periodically, they switch. Necessary conditions include compatible temperaments as well as cultural support in the team and organization. There are other factors, well discussed, as the use of this practice is about two decades old. Numerous articles discuss paired programming, its benefits (e.g., knowledge sharing), difficulties, and variations.

One of the results of this has been a significant decrease in defects. This is key towards the suggestion: for projects of greater complexity (starting at the upper range of medium), to better ensure project success, use a pair of project managers.

In addition to the need for compatible temperaments, the working environment needs to be supportive, with management not hostile to the idea.

During the initiation phase, having a 2nd knowledgeable viewpoint helps minimize likelihood of anything being overlooked in creation of a work breakdown structure (WBS); better communication planning; more inclusive and clearer risk identification and management strategies.

During project execution, .having two different people allows for more tailored stakeholder management, more bandwidth for individualized communication. In meetings, one can lead the meeting, with the other having the focus on analyzing the meeting dynamics, better able to avoid conflicts or facilitate their resolution if such arise, or even just taking better notes than one person trying to handle both.

If things start to really go badly, it is advantageous to have two perspectives, two sets of experiences upon which to draw, to turn the situation around.

Evaluate project complexity and success rates in your environment. If those rates are not satisfactory for projects of greater complexity, try paired project management.

Agile for Budgeting

Agile (Scrum in particular) is a framework for Product development, not just software development. It’s been successfully used for a wide variety of products, from medical devices to ad campaigns.

Let’s consider an organizational budget as another form of product, and explore if Agile might offer some advantages as an approach. Key among Agile values are embracing change; transparency; inspect and adapt.

Annual budgets are resistant to change, by their nature. While a sizeable portion of the budget might be necessarily fixed, not all of it need be. Some good-sized chunk of the overall budget can be marked as “adaptable”, being altered at some time-boxed frequency during the year, to best meet business priorities at that point in time, by a consistently organized team. Depending upon the organization, its culture and needs, the release of this could be quarterly or more often.

The overall annual budget tends to reflect a command and control culture in most organizations, even in those perceived otherwise. The budgeting typically is one pass, and then consolidated. Instead, try multiple passes, iterating, with transparency of plans between organizational units.

The funds for each item are implicitly the metric for business value; if there are other factors, then this needs to be explicitly stated, and ranking of business value made clear, for each budget item.

If an organization is going through a significant transformation, the budget not only should reflect this, but needs to adapt to changing circumstances along that transformational journey. The environment around the organization will change, and particularly for transformations, malleability is essential for success. Adaptive means agile, not the traditional approach.

note: originally posted to LinkedIn Pulse, Nov. 2015

Innovation and the Octopus

To create something innovative, one needs to look at things in a new way, going a quantum leap away from the well-trodden paths of the usual. To help stimulate creativity, try examining something unusual, something very different from our familiar world view.

Our way of viewing the world is that of an upright two legged, with two upper limbs and a hand at the end of each, having prehensile fingers.

Our companion animals usually are 4-legged, mostly with more acute sensory abilities than us, but overall, not too unlike ourselves and our view.

Our robotic creations tend to follow those structures and patterns, remaining close to the familiar.
For a very different perspective, consider the octopus and their marvelous abilities; a species millions of years older than our own.

Invertebrate: a large octopus can still squeeze through a 2 inch opening (or even smaller), presenting a challenge to keeping curious octopuses inside man-made containers or tanks. To date our robotic designs are vertebrate-centric; one might consider a soft robot, modeled after the octopus.

While almost all our cognitive neural capacity is centrally located in our brain, the octopus uses a more distributed model, with only about half centrally located, with the rest distributed to its limbs.

A user of tools and toys, one might contemplate what an octopus considers amusing or beautiful. What are the means and media of beauty and harmony for an octopus? How might that intersect with our own aesthetic concepts? Does the geometric pleasure of a Bach fugue resonate for an octopus?

Octopuses exhibit a wide range of behavioral patterns, perhaps falling into categories: are some more extroverted? How can one design a Meyers-Briggs type personality test for an octopus? For robots, how does one differentiate an introvert versus extrovert?

One might not readily associate the octopus with fashion and design, but some creative ideas might arise from contemplation of how a color-blind creature superbly camouflages more quickly than a chameleon. Could a chair be adaptive to the color or pattern of clothes worn by the person adorning it? Or have jewels adapt to nearby attire? (e.g., a modernized, Tiffany-class mood ring).

So much difference from our own way of being, our perceptions, should lead to some inspirations for innovation.

For those curious about the wonders of the octopus, try Sy Montgomery’s “Soul of an Octopus”. It’s a rich, clear and easy read, with the author’s tinge of wonder about the world.

Improving Requirements (Strengthening Waterfall)

One of the weaker phases in waterfall product development is the area of requirements.  Unclear or incorrect requirements are recognized as a major cause of grief on projects, if not outright disaster.

What is your feeling about the relationship between the requirements document and the ultimate product delivered?
How readily does the requirements document map to the required functionality?
Does it include a description or list of functionality that is out of scope? (“Thou shalt not…”)

In general, part of the problem is that there’s no real QA process on the requirements document, typically, only a user sign-off.  That’s an approval, not a QA process.  If the document is much over 10 pages, this is about as useful as handing someone a globe to use for direction to someone’s house for a holiday dinner.  You’re lucky if you even wind up in the right town, let alone the right neighborhood.

Typical waterfall environments have a QA function, usually for testing the finished product  Too often they only get involved late in development, often after all coding is allegedly done.  Why restrict their role so much?

Get them involved sooner, and involved with the analysts creating that requirements document. Involved, meaning interacting and talking directly to each other.  QA is designing the tests and should be able to identify unclear areas of the requirements, perhaps even missing parts. To flesh it out further, the QA group designs the tests based upon the requirements, and the business (not the BA who did the requirements) then reviews the test structures for completeness and accuracy, closing the feedback loop on the requirements document.  That process is independent of coding; it can start before any coding.

Another wobbly area is the clarity of the requirements for the developers.  Of course, clarity is only important when the document is actually read.

Another way to have some QA process for requirements is to have something similar to a peer review for coding, but in this case, instead of code, it is the requirements that are reviewed.

Come up with your variation of a QA process for requirements, one appropriate to the culture of your organization and resources available.

What’s Missing From Your SDLC

Having an SDLC (Software Development Life Cycle) documented is not to provide a minimum effort on development, or something to ignore, and keep writing programs as the mood strikes.  It’s part of an effort to follow best practices, to deliver high quality software on a repeated basis.  Even Agile methodologies can have an SDLC.

SDLC’s usually cover the core of the process of software creation, from initial requirements through design, coding, testing, integration, user acceptance, etc.  Some key elements are often overlooked, or considered not to be part of software development.  I’d like to suggest that you think about some areas that might improve the quality of the software you create if they are part of the SDLC.

Production support is not just about maintenance and fixing defects.  It’s about the ongoing improvement of what you delivered, preparation for the next release; part of the SDLC.  It’s about empowering the users, giving them the ability to fix their own problems when possible and reasonable; giving the right tools to the first level of support.  Not just documentation, an FAQ, or online Help, but items like creation of an error log and error trapping.  If the application has a database or data store, did you design a quality check on stored data, not just relying upon front end edit checking?

Does the application offer its users the opportunity to report problems, or give feedback about the interface they use?  What are the processes you envision for the ongoing improvement of the product?

Some SDLC’s include a Lessons Learned as part of closing out the development effort, project wrap-up.  The problem with that is it doesn’t do any good for the project in question, since that’s over, and seldom is examined either for the next release or by other projects.  Taking a page from the Agile approach of a retrospective for each iteration (sprint), why not do a Lessons Learned at each major milestone in the project, so the project can actually benefit while still in progress.

Security reviews should be part of the SDLC for all applications, not just web apps, not just for external facing ones.  How vulnerable is your application if another behind the firewall is compromised?  Security is part of the design process, not just something during the testing phase.

Security challenges are constantly changing, and some level of awareness needs to be part of the mindset of developers, not just IT security professionals.  Look towards organizations like OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project) as a resource.  Their Top Ten Security Risk list might startle some of your peers.

https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Category:OWASP_Top_Ten_Project

The Department of Homeland Security has some excellent resources, such as a National Vulnerability Database http://nvd.nist.gov/  as well as checklists and guidelines.  Look around their site.

Security is often a nightmare for developers, but there are people, organizations and tools to help you.

Look at your SDLC, think of the ongoing life of your applications, and what might enhance their quality.  The SDLC is an ongoing opportunity for process improvement.

 

Supporting Application Development

Methodologies or frameworks for the infrastructure to support Application Development (AD) is an interesting topic by itself, but one I’ve seldom seen mentioned or described, despite ITIL.  Even in companies that are following ITIL practices, the procedures are not often accompanied by feedback mechanisms to further improve things.

For example, do you trace incident or problem reports back to application change requests?  For major changes to application software, compare the post-implementation defect levels for different application groups.  Investigate the differences and consider ways to improve application development practices.

Many organizations believe that by designating support staff as level 1, 2 or 3, that they’ve established real procedures.  Other than “expected time to resolve” criteria, I’ve seldom heard of any real process analysis associated with those categories.  Nor have I heard of processes for a more organizationally flat structure.  A process needs to be more than assigning a severity level and contacting a software vendor.

What are your company’s infrastructure processes for supporting AD efforts?  What are the feedback mechanisms in those processes, such as periodic reviews?  If you were an infrastructure manager, how would you know how effective has been your support for AD, and where there may be perceived deficiencies?

Does each organization have a clear view of major plans and events for the next 3 to 6 months?  Does the AD area have any clues as to when systems is thinking of upgrading the version of the DBMS, or other essential software?

Hint to infrastructure:  if an AD team is pedal to the metal on delivering to the business, 2-3 weeks notice that you’re planning to upgrade to a new version of some key component is likely to be greeted by less than rabid enthusiasm.

Hint to the AD manager:  if you have not budgeted in time, resources and tooling (test scripts, etc.) for at least one version upgrade per year of the DBMS, and at least once every other year for the OS, some rude surprises may await you.

A tale of non-communication, with details altered out of sympathy:

Application development has a software product from a vendor, with much in-house enhancement.  In their published plans for the next quarter, AD had included an upgrade to a newer version of the product.  They knew that a newer version of the DBMS than currently used by the application would be needed for it, but since that newer version was already in use in-house by other applications, they were not concerned.

When the specific requirements became official requests to the infrastructure, the fun began.  The newer version of the DBMS required a newer version of the operating system than was currently used by that application.  And their servers were only marginal for the newer level of the OS; a hardware refresh was recommended.

The newer version of the OS not only brought along new run-time libraries, but used newer versions of compilers.  Even without any hardware refreshes, the regression testing alone for the DBMS and OS upgrades added significant time to the overall project.

Lesson learned:  frequent regular review of upcoming plans, including details as “DBMS version xxx needed.”  A review, meaning a meeting (even if virtual), with some communication, should be held.  Make sure the right people are talking to each other.