Paired Project Management

You probably have seen some of the statistics on project success rates, or more aptly, the rate of the lack of success. The Standish Group’s Chaos report is often cited as one source. There are numerous causes, but one suspects the statistics are even worse for projects of greater complexity.

There are multiple factors to project complexity: the impact strategically or financially to the enterprise; the overall stability of the environment; degree of uncertainty (in multiple dimensions and constraints – from, “is this definitely the right path?” to “will key resources remain”); the number of different disciplines involved; severity of social or legal impact; etc. Far too often, project managers don’t evaluate complexity at project initiation, only realizing the project is of significantly more complexity when difficulties are encountered.

Rule of thumb in planning:
the more complex an undertaking, the more likely any one individual will miss some key element.

One of the interesting practices in the Extreme Programming (XP) movement has been use of pair programming. Two programmers sharing a keyboard and monitor, working together. The typical dynamic is that of driver and navigator; periodically, they switch. Necessary conditions include compatible temperaments as well as cultural support in the team and organization. There are other factors, well discussed, as the use of this practice is about two decades old. Numerous articles discuss paired programming, its benefits (e.g., knowledge sharing), difficulties, and variations.

One of the results of this has been a significant decrease in defects. This is key towards the suggestion: for projects of greater complexity (starting at the upper range of medium), to better ensure project success, use a pair of project managers.

In addition to the need for compatible temperaments, the working environment needs to be supportive, with management not hostile to the idea.

During the initiation phase, having a 2nd knowledgeable viewpoint helps minimize likelihood of anything being overlooked in creation of a work breakdown structure (WBS); better communication planning; more inclusive and clearer risk identification and management strategies.

During project execution, .having two different people allows for more tailored stakeholder management, more bandwidth for individualized communication. In meetings, one can lead the meeting, with the other having the focus on analyzing the meeting dynamics, better able to avoid conflicts or facilitate their resolution if such arise, or even just taking better notes than one person trying to handle both.

If things start to really go badly, it is advantageous to have two perspectives, two sets of experiences upon which to draw, to turn the situation around.

Evaluate project complexity and success rates in your environment. If those rates are not satisfactory for projects of greater complexity, try paired project management.

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